Lair of Dreams by Libba Bray

Lair of Dreams Cover

Every city is a ghost. New buildings rise upon the bones of the old so that each shiny steel beam, each tower of brick carries within it the memories of what has gone before, an architectural haunting. Sometimes you can catch a glimpse of these former incarnations in the awkward angle of a street or a filigreed gate, an old oak door peeking out from a new facade, the plaque commemorating the spot that was once a battleground, which became a saloon and is now is a park.  ~Lair of Dreams

Lair of Dreams is the sequel to Libba Bray’s Diviners. It features much of the same cast (Evie, Jericho, Theta, Memphis, Mabel, and Sam), except the focus has shifted to the dream walkers–Ling Chan (who only had a brief cameo in the first) and Henry DuBois. Ling Chan is a resident of Chinatown, which is under threat from a mysterious sleeping illness. If anyone should be able to get to the bottom of the sleeping sickness, it should be the dream walkers, right? But Henry and Ling are pulled into the enchanting Lair of Dreams–where they not only walk in, but can shape dreams. And it will eventually be up to all the diviners to help Ling and Henry banish the ravenous ghosts of the past.

I was definitely NOT disappointed by this sequel to the amazing Diviners. In fact, the writing and the characters were just as solid as in the first. Evie is quickly becoming a live-for-the-now, constantly partying, flapper girl. Sam is becoming more desperate to find his mother and Project Buffalo. And Memphis and Theta’s relationship grows ever more complicated under the weight of both of their secrets. I love the diviners, each and every one. Libba Bray has crafted some insanely lovable characters and in this sequel, we get to learn even more about Ling, Henry, Sam, and Theta.

I recommend the Diviners series to anyone who loves a good historical and fantasy fiction blend. Or, basically, I recommend this series to anyone who loves to read anything amazing!

 

 

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