Monthly Archives: May 2013

The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

“Gansey,” he said. Though his voice was quiet, it wasn’t a whisper. It was a real voice spoken from someplace almost too far away to hear.
Blue couldn’t stop staring at his mussed hair, the suggestion of staring eyes, the raven on his sweater. His shoulders were soaked, she saw, and the rest of his clothing ran spattered, from a storm that hadn’t happened yet. This close, she could smell something minty that she wasn’t sure was unique to him or unique to spirits. He was so real. When it finally happened, when she finally saw him, it didn’t feel like magic at all. It felt like looking into the grave and seeing it look back at her.
“Is that all?” she whispered.
Gansey closed his eyes. “That’s all there is.”
~Maggie Stiefvater, The Raven Boys

Blue Sargent has been raised and surrounded her whole life by women who are able to see and touch the supernatural. Her mother and “aunts” are psychics—the real deal. They don’t make very much money from their readings, but their readings are genuine and accurate. Blue, however, does not possess any psychic powers herself: she is only able to make the powers of others stronger from her presence. Blue longs to be able to touch the supernatural world, and Gansey, an affluent, obsessive private schooled boy and his small troop of friends can offer that to her in the form of the hunt for an ancient Welsh king, waiting somewhere close to be awakened.
The Raven Boys is a must read for those interested in supernatural fantasy fiction.
More of my thoughts below: with slight spoilers!!!!
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May 20, 2013 · 8:22 pm

Book of The Week On Thursday

Book of The Week On Thursday

or……BOTWOT!

Here it is, once again ladies and gentlemen: the book of the week on Thursday!
Explanation: Every week on Thursday I will endeavor to pick a book (any book from any genre, including non-fiction, criticism, and poetry) to showcase each week. Just because I can. I will include a quote from the book and a short summary. Also, I will include updates on what I am reading, what I’m planning on reading/reviewing next. And any other tidbits of information I want to bequeath to the internet.
So here goes!

And the winner is:

Glimmerglass

I’d been the adult in this family since I was about five, and now it was time for me to take my life into my own hands. I was going to contact my father and, unless I got some kind of vibe that said he really was an abusive pervert, I was going to go live with him. In Avalon. In the Wild City that was the crossroads between our world and Faerie, the city where magic and technology coexisted in something resembling peace.
~Glimmerglass by Jenna Black

Dana is tired of taking care of her mother who is an alcoholic. She finally decides to contact her father, who is some sort of big shot Fae politician in the city of Avalon: the gateway between our world and the world of Faerie. Dana is half Fae but has grown up her whole life in the human world. Now she’ll have to learn about and explore her Fae roots in order to survive the cunning of Fae politics.
This book surprised me–at first I found Dana to be somewhat whiny and the beginning of the novel somewhat slow. However, the story definitely picks up and turned out be a fun, adventurous read. I wish I had an “I went to Avalon and all I got was this T-shirt” t-shirt!

Bookish News
What I read before: The Fifth Wave by Rick Yancey
What I’m reading now: The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater
What I’m reading next: ?????

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May 16, 2013 · 11:29 pm

Beauty Queens by Libba Bray

Beauty Queens by Libba Bray

This book begins with a plane crash. We do not want you to worry about this. According to the U.S. Department of Unnecessary Statistics, your chances of dying in a plane crash are one in half a million. Whereas your chances of losing your bathing suit bottoms to a strong tide are two to one. So, all in all, it’s safer to fly than to go to the beach.
~Beauty Queens, Libba Bray

Beauty Queens is action-packed, hilarious satire that can somewhat be described as Lord of the Flies with teenage beauty pageant contestants. However, this book is so much more than that simple description. Yes, the girls crash land on what seems to be a deserted island and at first are in shock over what has happened and try to maintain their beauty pageant rituals. But soon they realize that they must come together in order to survive. As the girls learn from each other, stick together against giant snakes and smooth-tongued, “bodacious” pirates, they become strong enough to be able to take down their true enemies.
This is a bad-ass, hilarious, and heartwarming novel, which I recommend to all and any girls: even those of us who are beyond our teens.
Below are just some thoughts I have on the novel, but these include some mild spoiling!
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May 14, 2013 · 3:33 pm

Book of The Week On Thursday

Book of The Week On Thursday
or……BOTWOT!

Here it is, once again ladies and gentlemen: the book of the week on Thursday!
Explanation: Every week on Thursday I will endeavor to pick a book (any book from any genre, including non-fiction, criticism, and poetry) to showcase each week. Just because I can. I will include a quote from the book and a short summary. Also, I will include updates on what I am reading, what I’m planning on reading/reviewing next. And any other tidbits of information I want to bequeath to the internet.
So here goes!

And the winner for this week is…..(drum-roll)

Why I Let My Hair Grow Out by Maryrose Wood

I finally reached an open area with a big sign overhead that read, MEETING POINT. Right underneath the sign was a tall, beefy guy basically okay-looking guy leaning against a column, and he was holding a much smaller, handwritten sign of his own. It read:

I come to fetch the bonnie Morgan.
Hope your arse is ready for the trip!
Your friends at The Emerald Cycle Bike Tour Company

~From Why I Let My Hair Grow Out (p. 16-17)

About This Book
Morgan’s parents want to “fix” her after her boyfriend Raphael breaks up with her (leading to shocking hair-cutting incident that leaves her nearly bald). They pay her way to take a cycle-tour of The Emerald Isle. Morgan is less than pleased. But she’d rather be doing anything than be stuck at home with her annoying little sister and her confused, concerned parents. So now she will be riding her arse up and down Ireland. She plans on being surly and difficult the whole time, but something happens to derail her plans. Morgan is thrown hundreds of years into the past: into the days of Irish Legend where she is long-haired Morganne and must find a way to save the world.
By far this is one of the most fun travel/adventure stories I’ve read. It’s one of my favorites–Maryrose Wood’s prose is chatty and snarky and fast and hilarious. Great for fans of Meg Cabot or someone looking for fun, light-hearted fantasy.

Bookish News
What I read before: The Moon and More by Sarah Dessen
What I’m Reading Currently: Beauty Queens by Libba Bray
What I’ll Be Reading Next: The Fifth Wave by Rick Yancey
Before you go, here’s a picture of Paul Bettany as Chaucer in the wonderful movie A Knight’s Tale
chaucer-haters-a-knights-tale-57604197754
My favorite quote from Movie Chaucer: I know I lied. I’m a writer, I give the truth scope!
Well, I guess that’s all!
Until next time,
Molly (aka The Book Hunter)

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May 9, 2013 · 9:34 pm

Censorship

This is the science teacher’s defense from the movie Frankenweenie (amazing/adorable movie, by the way). After seeing this today, I honestly wish that I was allowed to say something along these lines to censors. However, that probably goes against best practices in most libraries. I’m hoping that the Academic Library world at a university will be riddled with less censorship issues, but who really knows?

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May 9, 2013 · 12:42 am

Girl Parts by John M. Cusick

Girl Parts by John M. Cusick

David and Charlie both attend the same all-boys Catholic school in near-future Massachusetts. Both have been diagnosed by the school counselor as being “disassociated” with their peers. However, only David’s parents agree to the guidance counselor’s form of therapy: a beautiful, life-size, ultra-life like, female robot from Japan that will supposedly teach David how to be in a real, loving relationship. And while Rose does love David and David couldn’t be more excited about having the ultimate sex doll, both of them are shocked when they find out the manufacturers in Japan have left out the essential “girl parts.” David abandons Rose, who now turns to Charlie for help and comfort.

Girl Parts was funny, fast-paced, and at times poignant and moving. The author has a lot to say about technology and how it can connect us with other people in ways we could never have imagined in the past, but it also serves us a scary future: one of being “disassociated” and “disconnected” from others around us. I call this a “soft” science fiction. Because although for all intents and purpose Rose and the companions are futuristic robots, this story is really more of social commentary on our very real reality: the failed connections between young men and women, between young adults and their parents, and between all people.

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May 6, 2013 · 5:46 pm

The Moon And More by Sarah Dessen

The Moon And More by Sarah Dessen

“Whatever you need, I will find a way to get it to you. I will give you the moon and more.” ~The Moon and More, Sarah Dessen

The Moon And More captures the story of Emaline’s last summer before going to college. Emaline must learn how to balance her love and fierce devotion for her family and small hometown on the beach, Colby, with new opportunities that have suddenly come into her life. She has a great boyfriend, wonderful family and friends, and full scholarship to a school not so far away. What more could she ever want? In this novel, Sarah Dessen explores this question and once again weaves a compelling story full of fascinating and funny supporting characters whom you’ll already feel as though you’ve known your whole life and offers a look at a character who must juggle all of those what ifs? we struggle with in life, before leaving for college or otherwise.

Below I’m posting more of my thoughts on Emaline’s story. However, read at your own risk, there are SPOILERS:
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May 5, 2013 · 6:37 pm